CHS Course List and Description

 

Science

Anatomy and Physiology - Nature of science; habits and skills of science; human body; nutrition concepts; digestive system; circulatory system; nervous system; reproductive system; form and function; dissection; laboratory course; inquiry; technology. (Grades 11&12)

Biology - Nature of science; habits and skills of science; biological safety/biohazard; cellular biochemistry; organizations, form and function; diversity; heredity; interdependence; statistical approach; theoretical; problem solving/inquiry-based approach; laboratory course; technology. (Grade 9)

Pre-AP Biology - This academically challenging course includes an in-depth study of the biological sciences.  Topics of study include: laboratory measurement and technique, cellular structure and function, molecular biology, the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, DNA and genetics.  It also includes detailed study of the six kingdoms of living organisms and the flow of energy through ecosystems.  Dissections, experiments and demonstrations make this course an exciting one for the advanced science student. Grade 9. Prerequisite: Recommendation by 8th grade Science Teacher. 

Physical Science - Physical Science is a conceptual, inquiry-based course that provides students with an investigation of the basic concepts of chemistry and physics. Students use evidence from their own investigations as well as the investigations of others to develop and refine knowledge of core ideas. The standards provide a depth of conceptual understanding that will adequately prepare
them for college, career, and citizenship with an appropriate level of scientific literacy.

Chemistry - Nature of science; habits and skills of science; chemical safety; properties of and changes in matter; chemical applications of and changes in energy; Science, Technology, and Society (STS); problem solving approach; practical applications; inquiry-based approach; laboratory course; technology. (Grades 10, 11 & 12) Prerequisites: Algebra I, Biology; Algebra II with Trigonometry Recommended

PreAP Chemistry - This course emphasizes such topics as metric measurement and dimensional analysis; matter and energy; physical, chemical, and nuclear changes; chemical elements and symbols; atomic structure; mole calculations; chemical formulas; types of reactions; writing and balancing equations; stoichiometry; and the quantum model of the atom. It also emphasizes such topics as periodic law and trends, chemical bonding, phases of matter, kinetic theory and the gas laws, solutions, ionization, acids, bases, and salts. If time permits these additional topics are covered: Reaction Rate, Equilibrium, Redox 76 Reactions, Organic Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry, and Electrochemistry. Practical application of chemical concepts are reinforced through laboratory techniques. (Grades 10, 11 &/or 12) Prerequisites: Algebra I, Pre-AP Biology, Algebra II with Trigonometry recommended.

Environmental Science - Nature of science; habits and skills of science; biosphere; ecological interactions; biomes; human population; enregy resources; biosphere resources; human impacts; laboratory course; inquiry; technology. (Grades 11 & 12)

Forensic Science - Focuses on the analysis of evidence collection, the decomposition process, crime scenes, skeletal remains, toxicology, and document validity. Case studies and crime scenarios help students understand the implications and complicated issues of the science of forensics.         (Grades 11 & 12)

Physics - Nature of science; habits and skills of science; safety; quantitative relationships among variables; universe; matter; energy; force; motion; mathematics-based; problem solving-inquiry-based approach; laboratory course; technology. (Grades 11 & 12) Prerequisites: Biology, Physical Science, Algebra II with Trigonometry


English/Language Arts

English (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12) - Reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and presenting skills; literature interpretation and appreciation; vocabulary study; mechanics; grammar and usage; spelling; study skills.

AP Language and Composition (Grades 11 & 12) - Engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The objective of the course is to enable students to write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives. Prerequisites English 11 or English 11A

AP English Literature & Composition (Grades 11 & 12) - Designed for academically talented students, this course focuses on world literature (especially novels and drama) and on learning to write literary criticism based on that literature. It offers a select group of seniors the opportunity to experience college-level work, using college-level textbooks. Students perfect critical reading and writing skills and take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition in the spring. Prerequisites: English 11 or AP Language and Composition

 

Mathematics 

Algebra I - Formal, in-depth study of algebraic concepts and the  real number system; algebraic expressions; equations and inequalities; functions; graphing; equations of lines; applying formulas to find perimeter, area, volume, circumference, distance, midpoint, and slope; systems of equations; quadratic, radical and absolute value equations; basic probability and statistics; problem solving. (Grade 9)

Algebra IA - First part of a formal study of algebraic concepts and the real number system; approximately one half the content of Algebra I. (Grade 9)

Algebra IB - Second part of a formal study of algebraic concepts and the real number system; approximately one half the content of Algebra I. (Grade 9)

Geometry - Study of plane and solid geometry; theorems; constructions and modeling; lines; area; perimeter; volume; angle relationships; parallel and perpendicular lines; polygons; right triangles; radical equations; congruence; similarity; symmetry; study of axiomatic systems. (Grade10)   Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA & IB

Algebra with Finance - Integerates algebra, precalculus, probability and statistics, calculus and geometry to solve financial problems that occur in everyday life. Real-world problems in investing, credit, banking, auto insurance, mortgages, employment, income taxes, budgeting and planning for retirement are solved by applying the relevant mathematics taught at a higher level. (Grade 11) Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry

Pre-AP Geometry - A rigorous course, this class emphasizes higher order thinking skills by deducing properties of and relationships between figures from given assumptions as well as by exploring concepts related to two-and three-dimensional figures. Extensive integration of algebra in problem solving requires a strong algebra background for this course. Topics include logic, proof, parallel lines, congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, regular polygons, and geometric transformations. Prerequisites: Algebra I or Pre-AP AlgebraI.

Pre-AP Algebra II with Trigonometry - Integrated course; advanced algebra topics; complex numbers; function graphing; theory of equations; polynomials; irrational numbers; problem solving; logarithms; quadratic equations; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; sequences and series; polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; probability and statistics topics; trigonometry. (Grade 11)   Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry 

Algebra II - Advanced algebra topics; complex numbers; function graphing; theory of equations; polynomials; irrational numbers; problem solving; logarithms; quadratic equations; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; sequences and series; polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; probability and statistics topics. (Grade 11 ) Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry

Pre-AP Pre-Calculus - Reasoning skills and connections among topics are emphasized in this course. Functions, trigonometry, theory of equations, limits, polar functions, and probability and statistics are among topics covered. Graphing and problem solving are vital to understanding in this course. Topics covered include: sequences and series, graph theory and discrete mathematics, limits, derivatives, and integrals. SPECIAL NOTE: Students completing this course may take either Calculus AB or BC depending upon their achievement level and the demand. (Grade 12) Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II with Trig

Mathematical Investigations - Mathematical Investigations is intended to extend students' knowledge of mathematical development. Beginning with ancient numeration systems, students explore relationships between mathematics and nature, music, art and architecture as well as the contributions of well-known mathematicians. It extends the scope of prerequisite courses, integrating topics with and emphasis on application-based problem solving. The wide range of topics and applied problems may lend itself to organizing the content into thematic units. (Grade 12) Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II with Trig.

 

History/ Social Studies 

World History and Geography Since 1500 - Chronological history of the world; the emergence of a global age; the Age of revolutions; the Age of Isms; era of global war; the world from 1945 to present. (Grade 9)

United States History and Geography: Beginnings to 1877 - Chronological survey of major issues; three worlds and their encounter in America; the Colonial Era, creating a nation; expansion and reform; the Civil War and Reconstructions; the development of the industrial United States; concepts related to Alabama history and geography. (Grade 10)

United States History and Geography: 1877 to the Present - Chronological survey of major issues; the emergence of modern America; the Great Depression and World War II; Post-war United States; contemporary United States. (Grade 11)

Government - Representative democracy; federalism; political and civic life; international relations. (Grade 12)

Economics - Basic elements of economics; comparative economic systems; role of the consumer; business and labor issues; functions of government; macroeconomic concepts. (Grade 12)

 

General Electives

L.I.F.E. (Lifelong Individual Fitness Education) - Motor skill development; health enhancing physical activity; interactive behavior; weight lifting; cardiovascular fitness activities.

Career Preparedness - A one credit course designed to prepare students with content knowledge and skills to be college and career ready. It incorporates three components: career development and academic planning; computer skill application; and financial literacy knowledge. This course is designed to meet the required 20-hour online experience. (Grade 9)

Driver Education - Safe driving theory; in class study; driving hazards; boating safety; behind the wheel experience; safety practices.

P E ½ - Motor skill development; health enhancing physical activity; interactive behavior; weight lifting; cardiovascular fitness activities. Physical Education component that goes with Driver Education.

Health/First Aid - Basic concepts of wellness and health promotion; accessing health information, products and services; practice application of health decision-making and goal-setting skills. Grade 9 or 10

Arts Survey - Foreign culture, history, dance, music, theta, visual arts, architecture, and literature.

Band - Participation in band, playing, marching, music development.

Music Appreciation- Hearing and studying music; music forms and genres; music styles of different historical periods.

Creative Writing  - Yearbook study; yearbook production; news information gathering; proofreading; layout; in-depth editing. (Grades 11 & 12)

Office Assistant - Office skills development; filing; office equipment operation. (Grades 11 &12)

Library Assistant - Library skills development; filing; office equipment operation. (Grades 11&12)

Art I - Overview course; drawing design elements, color theory, opaque painting, art history, pastel painting, and calligraphy.

Art II - Drawing, opaque painting, watercolor painting, art history, pastel painting, and ceramics. (Grades 10-12) Prerequisite: Art I

Art III - Advanced painting (Acrylics, watercolor, and pastel); advanced ceramics, and printmaking. (Grades 10-12)  Prerequisite: Art I & II

Art IV - Advanced painting; advanced ceramics; and advanced printmaking. (Grades 10-12)  Prerequisite: Art I, II & III

 

 

Career Tech/Business Education Electives

Animal Science - Identify employment opportunities in the livestock industry; safety procedures for handling livestock; domestication of livestock; livestock by common names; benefits of livestock production to society; history of major large animal breeds; facilities used to manage livestock;  digestive systems of large animals; proper nutrition and rations for large animals; methods of disease prevention; reproduction; animal rights; economically important specialty animals and animal products, requirements for regular and specialty animal production.

Fundamentals of AG - Provides students with a general overview of the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Cluster. Students have career options for five different pathways in Agriscience: Power, Structure, and Technical Systems; Environmental and Natural Resources Systems; Animal Systems; Plant Systems; and Agribusiness Systems. Students are involved in classroom and laboratory activities in each of the five pathway areas. This course includes a broad range of topics such as: career opportunities, safety, technology applications, agribusiness leadership, environmental science, soil science, plant science, forestry, animal science, aquaculture, wildlife science, pest management, woodworking, metalworking, small engines, electrical wiring, and plumbing.

Construction Finishing and Interior Systems - Designed to provide understanding of the finishing phase of a structure. Students become familiar with the exterior and interior finishing of a structure. Topics include career opportunities, safety, windows, doors, plumbing, electrical wiring, insulation, wall coverings, storage, and finishes.

Construction Framing - Designed to provide understanding of the beginning phase of a structure. Students become familiar with the exterior and interior beginning of a structure. Topics include career opportunities, safety, framing materials, calculating costs, flooring systems, wall framing snd sheathing systems, ceiling frmaing systems, stairways and roofing.

Introduction to Metal Fabrication (Welding I) - Provides opportunities to examine safety and technical information in metal fabrication and to participate in hands-on activities in the laboratory. Topics include career opportunities, safety, identification and selection, metal preparation and finishing, metal cutting, weld quality, and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)

Introduction to Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) (Welding II) - Provides opportunities to examine safety and technical information in metal fabrication and to participate in hands-on activities in the laboratory. Topics include career opportunities, safety, planning metal structures, identification and selection, and weld quality.

Horticulture - Students receive instruction about the multi-faceted industry and participate in hands-on activities in the areas of careers, technological advancements, employability skills, SAEPs, computer application, basic plant science, plant propagation, soil and media mixture, plant nutrition, green house design and structures, nursery crops, hydroponics, and vegetable gardening. This course encourages critical thinking, use of the scientific method, integration of technology, development of student leadership skills, and application of knowledge and skills related to practical questions/problems.

Business Technology Applications - Designed to help students master basic skills in the areas of word processing, database management, spreadsheet, presentation, Internet, and E-mail. It also offers the opportunity to identify ethical issues pertaining to information systems and to gather information about careers in technology. (Grade 9)

Advanced Technology Applications - This is a one-credit course that provides students with project-based applications of  concepts learned in Business Technology Applications. Personal computing and business skills are integrated throughout the course as students use a variety of software applications. Students learn how to produce and prepare documents for publication and to select appropriate software for generating information. The second semester of this course emphasizes guiding students through real-world experiences to aid in the school-to-career transition. Students will acquire skills in word processing applications, spreadsheet applications, database applications, the creation of a multimedia resume, and internet research. (Grades 10-12)

Business and Marketing Essentials - An introductory course that addresses the principles and concepts that serve as the foundation for future student in the Business/Marketing Education program. Topics include basic business principles, marketing concepts, systems thinking and total quality, and the current environment for business and marketing in the marketplace.

Personal and Business Finance - This is a one-credit course that focuses on areas of study that address personal financial planning, financial services, budgeting, investments, insurance protection, credit management, consumer purchases and consumer rights and responsibilites. It teaches decision-making skills that enbles students to become more responsible consumers, producers, or business entrepreneurs.

Accounting Principles - Teaches the basic principles of the accounting cycle: analyzing and recording business transactions; preparing and interpreting financial statements, accounting systems, banking and payroll activities; identifying basic types of business ownership; and participating in an orientation to careers in accounting.

Multimedia Design - Designed to provide students with skills involving power point presentations; desktop publishing; web design and publishing; and digital video production and graphics. Students use various hardware peripherals and the internet to create a variety of publications. Prerequisite - Business Technology Essentials. (Grades 10-12)

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses - Math    

Algebra I (1 credit) - A formal, in-depth study of algebraic concepts and the real number system. It reinforces concepts learned in previous courses and focuses on the useful application of course content and on the development of student understanding of central concepts. Students will explore new, more challenging content which prepares them for further study in mathematics. Prerequisite: PreAlgebra or 8th grade Math

Algebra_IA (1 credit) - The first part of a formal study of algebraic concepts and the real number system; approximately one-half the content of Algebra I. Prerequisite: PreAlgebra or 8th grade Math

Algebra IB (1 credit) - The second part of a formal study of algebraic concepts and the real number system; approximately one-half the content of Algebra I. Prerequisite: Algebra IA

Geometry (1 credit) - Provides students with knowledge about shapes and properties and assists with the development of spatial sense, critical for further study in mathematics and for everyday life. Emphasis is placed on the power of deductive reasoning, expressed either informally or formally, in a variety of formats. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA & IB

Algebra II with Trigonometry (1 credit) - Focuses on problem-solving skills that use a variety of methods to encourage the development of improved communication skills and foster a deeper understanding of the algebraic content area. Credit cannot be awarded for both Algebra II with Trigonometry and Algebra II. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA & IB and Geometry 

Algebra II (1 credit) - Focuses on problem-solving skills that use a variety of methods to encourage the development of improved communication skills and foster a deeper understanding of the algebraic content area. Credit cannot be awarded for both Algebra II with Trigonometry and Algebra II. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA & IB and Geometry

Precalculus (1 credit) - Designed primarily for those students considering careers in mathematical or scientific fields of study. The curriculum includes an expanded study of polynomial functions, conic sections, logarithmic and exponential equations, and the real-life applications of these topics. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II/Trigonometry

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses -  Science        

Physical Science(1 credit) - An inquiry-based core course which includes the basic concepts and skills in chemistry and physics that are considered foundational in those disciplines. Focuses on scientific facts, concepts, principles, theories, and models that are important for scientific literacy                              

Biology (1 credit) - An introduction to general biology and the processes of scientific inquiry. It includes the fundamental principles of living organisms including physical and chemical properties of life, cellular organization and function, the transfer of energy through metabolic systems, cellular reproduction, the classification of living things, the examination of the six kingdoms, and discussion of current scientific principles and concepts.

Chemistry (1 credit) - Focuses on scientific facts, concepts, principles, theories, and models considered foundational to chemistry in terms of structure, form, change, availability, and use of matter and energy. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Biology; Algebra II with Trigonometry Recommended

Environmental Science (1 credit) - Designed to provide a broad view of the biosphere and the physical parameters that affect it. Core content focuses on scientific facts, concepts, principles, theories, and models considered foundational to environmental science, including energy resources, environmental quality, and human practices and their effect on the environment. Prerequisites: Biology and Physical Science or Chemistry

Physics (1 credit) - Focuses on scientific facts, concepts, principles, theories, and models considered foundational to physics in terms of mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, and magnetism. Prerequisites: Biology, Physical Science, Algebra II with Trigonometry

Marine Science(1 credit) - An inquiry-based college-prep elective intended to provide advanced studies of science within the context of the marine environment. Core content focuses on scientific facts, concepts, principles, theories, and models considered foundational to marine science, including living organisms, oceanography, marine water chemistry, anatomy and physiology of saltwater organisms, classification, biodiversity, interdependence of organisms within marine biomes, and human and natural impact on marine systems. Prerequisites: Biology and Physical Science; Chemistry recommended

AP Biology (1 credit) - Designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. Content is addressed within the three basic subject areas: molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. Students are provided with a variety of laboratory experiences, including the 12 AP Biology labs equivalent to that of a typical college course. Students are encouraged to take the AP Biology Exam in order to earn college credit.Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

AP Chemistry (1credit) - Designed to introduce students to general chemistry equivalent to a full-year introductory college course. The course has been authorized by the College Board and meets all requirements established by that organization. Chemical problems will be assessed using fundamental analytical skills. Elaborate lessons will help students develop the necessary skills to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgment and present evidence in clear and persuasive essays. Semester I will include components of matter, stoichiometry of formulas and equations, chemical reactions, gases and the Kinetic-Molecular Theory, thermochemistry, Quantum Theory, electron configuration and chemical periodicity, models of chemical bonding, shapes of molecules, and theories of covalent bonding. Semester II will include intermolecular forces, properties of mixtures, periodic patterns, organic compounds, the atomic properties of carbon, kinetics and equilibrium of chemical reactions, oxidation and reduction reactions, and thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Prerequisites: Chemistry

AP Environmental Science (1credit) - College level; advanced-level course; scientific process and application skills; earth systems and resources; the living world; population; land and water; energy resources and consumption; pollution; global change. Does not fulfill the physical science graduation requirement.

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses -  English

English 9, 10, 11, 12 (1 credit each)

AP English Language and Composition (1 credit) - Designed to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. The course also engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Prerequisites: English 9, 10, & 11 with a minimum B average

AP English Literature and Composition (1 credit) - Includes an intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Students are encouraged to take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam in order to earn college credit. Prerequisites: English 9, 10, & 11 with a minimum B average

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses -  Social Studies

US History from 1877 to Present (1 credit) - Achronological survey of major events and issues that include colonization and the American revolution, the development of a political system and its distinct culture, reform movements, sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and concepts related to Alabama history and geography.

US History from to 1877 (1 credit) - Continues the journey begun in the tenth grade through the economic, geographic, social, and political development of the United States. Includes the study of major events, issues, movements, and leaders of the United States through the present from both a national and an Alabama perspective.

World History 1500 to Present (1 credit) - Covers the chronological history of the world from the emergence of a global age through the Age of Revolutions, the Age of Isms, the era of global war, and the world from 1945 to the present.

Economics (.5 credit) - Focuses on functions and institutions of modern-day economic systems and economic theory. The course includes activities requiring the use of analytical-thinking skills for recognizing economic and social problems, proposing alternatives, and evaluating the costs and benefits of choices.

US Government (.5 credit) - Fosters the development of civic competence and civic participation. Emphasis is placed on the intellectual factors that influenced the development of a republic based on the rule of law, freedom of opportunity, individual liberty, and representative democracy. The course includes a detailed study of the Constitution of the United States and activities requiring the use of analytical-thinking skills for collection, in-depth analysis, and interpretation of information important to the study of government.

AP US History (1 credit) - AP United States History is equivalent to an introductory college course in U.S. history. Studies cover a range of topics from Pre-Columbian societies to today. The course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. Students are encouraged to take the AP United States History Exam in order to earn college credit.

AP US Government and Politics (.5 credit) - AP U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students are encouraged to take the AP United States Government and Politics Exam in order to earn college credit. Prerequisite: US History

AP Macroeconomics (.5 credit) - Will give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. It places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students are encouraged to take the AP Macroeconomics Exam in order to earn college credit.

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses -  Foreign Language

Spanish I (1 credit) - A first-year modern language course which provides students with opportunities to communicate at a basic level, to develop insights into Spanish cultures, to better understand their own language and culture, to access knowledge from other disciplines using Spanish, and to participate more fully in the global community.

Spanish II (1 credit) - A second-year modern language course which provides a continuum for the review and expansion of the goals of Spanish I. A progression of handling more complex elements of communication, broadening insights into Spanish cultures and enhancing the connections made with other disciplines. Prerequisite: Spanish I

Latin I (1 credit) - A first-year classical language course, which provides an introduction to the Latin language and Roman culture. Illustrates the influence of the Roman culture on the cultures of the Western world throughout history. Basic pronunciation, spelling, and translation are included in the course; emphasis is placed on reading, grammar, and culture.

Latin II (1 credit) - A second-year classical language course, which includes a review of the skills previously studied, often accomplished by using Roman literature, Roman history, Roman mythology, and a study of Caesar's Commentaries. Prerequisite: Latin I

French I (1 credit) - Provides students with opportunities to communicate through speaking, writing, reading, and listening at a basic level; to develop insights into French cultures; to better understand their own language and culture; to access knowledge from other disciplines using French; and to participate more fully in the global community.

French II (1 credit) - Provides a continuum for the review and expansion of the goals of French I. Level II represents a progression in terms of students' facility in handling more complex elements of communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening; broadening insights into French cultures as well as their own; and enhancing the connections made with other disciplines (as well as the connections made with the community and with the world). Prerequisite: French I

German I (1 credit) - Provides students with opportunities to communicate at a basic level; to develop insights into German cultures; to better understand their own language and culture; to access knowledge from other disciplines using German; and to participate more fully in the global community.

German II (1 credit) - Provides students with opportunities to communicate at a basic level; to develop insights into German cultures; to better understand their own language and culture; to access knowledge from other disciplines using German; and to participate more fully in the global community. Prerequisite: German I

Mandarin Chinese I (1 credit) - A beginning level course which introduces the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin Chinese (simplified). In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing , grammar is introduced and practiced, the Chinese speaking world and its culture, people, geographical locations, and history.

Mandarin Chinese II (1 credit) - An intermediate level course which introduces the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin Chinese (simplified). The student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, grammar is introduced and practiced . Students learn to express themselves using an increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Units include daily routine, animals, hobbies, the body, and descriptions; the Chinese speaking world and its culture, people, geographical locations, and history. Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I

AP Latin (1 credit) - Advanced-level college performance in reading, translating, understanding, analyzing, and interpreting Vergil's Aeneid; grammar and vocabulary study; literary techniques; poetic meter; cultural, social, political context of literature studied; sight reading; writing of analytical and interpretive essays based on reading selections

American Sign Language I (1 credit) - Syntax and grammar study including basic physical and linguistic features; understanding and responding to simple directions, expressions of courtesy, and questions related to daily routines; identifying main ideas from signed narratives; creating short presentations on familiar topics; beginning understanding of deaf cultures.

American Sign Language II (1 credit) - Syntax and grammar study including understanding and responding to various directions, commands, and questions; interpreting culturally authentic narratives; creating short presentations; further understanding of deaf cultures. Prerequisite: American Sign Language I

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses -  Electives

Bible as Literature (1 credit) - Study of the Old Testament; New Testament; heroes; prophecies; poetry and prose style.

Creative Writing (.5 credit) - Students will learn to express themselves in their writing by composing poetry, short stories, and critical responses. They will be required to keep a journal with daily writing assignments.

Creative Writing (1 credit) - Students will learn to express themselves in their writing by composing poetry, short stories, and critical responses. They will be required to keep a journal with daily writing assignments.

Reading 2 Succeed (.5 credit) - Designed to help prepare students for the Reading portion of the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE). Reading passages for the course mirror those found on the AHSGE and may be categorized as these three text types: textual materials, recreational materials, and functional materials. Activities and assessments allow students opportunities to increase their critical thinking skills in order to gain a deeper understanding of the covered objectives.

Global Studies (1 credit) - Uses research and writing in assignments designed to help students learn about human rights, the environment, global security, and international economic systems. Students will identify real global problems and then suggest well-developed solutions. This course does not count as one of the four Social Studies courses required for graduation.

Health Education (.5 credit) - Covers the basic concepts of wellness and health promotion; accessing health information, products and services; application of health decision-making and goal-setting skills; and the impact of technology on health. Health Education students are required to receive instruction in CPR from instructors certified by the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross. In order to meet this requirement, students enrolled in this course must choose between two options: 1. Become independently certified through an outside AHA or ARC program; or 2. Demonstrate CPR skills to a certified CPR trainer who is also a teacher, coach, or EMT. The trainer will then submit a proctor form verifying the appropriate demonstration of skills. It is the responsibility of the school to arrange for the CPR training needs 

Journalism  (5 credit) - Designed for ninth-graders; includes newspaper study; newspaper production; news information gathering; proofreading; journalistic writing.

Nutrition & Wellness (.5 credit) - Introduces students to good nutrition principles for human physical and mental wellness: digestion and major nutrients, body size and weight management, physical fitness, sports nutrition, stress and fitness, and life-span nutrition.

AP Psychology (1 credit) - Designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. This course introduces students to the major topics of the field, the terminology and methodology of psychology, and the historical and current understanding of human behavior and thought processes. Students will learn to analyze human experiences like psychologists do and apply what they have learned in the world around them. Its study is equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. Students are encouraged to take the AP Psychology Exam in order to earn college credit.

Psychology (.5 credit) - A study of the history of psychological inquiry, methods of scientific research, biological basis of behavior, human development and individual differences, states of consciousness in learning and memory, psychological disorders and treatments, and terminology and theories.

Sociology (.5 credit) - Culture and society; social inequalities; social institutions; social change.

Accounting (1 credit) - Designed to help students understand the basic principles of the accounting cycle. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic financial accounting, including analyzing and recording business transactions, preparing and interpreting financial statements, demonstrating generally accepted accounting principles, and performing banking and payroll activities.

Personal Finance (.5 credit) - Provides an understanding of financial management concepts, personal finances, which include budgeting, saving, checking, investments, credit, insurance, paying and preparing income tax returns, employment forms, and basic financial skills for life. Students learn to better prepare financially for their futures through wise money management.

Business Technology Applications (1 credit) - designed to assist students in developing technological proficiencies in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, communications, Internet use, ethics, and careers using technology applications

Advanced Technology Applications (1 credit) - Provides students with project-based applications of concepts learned in Business Technology Applications or Business Essentials. Personal computing and business skills are integrated throughout the course as students use a variety of software applications to produce and prepare documents for publication and learn how to select appropriate software for generating information. Prerequisites: BTA or Business Essentials

Computer Programming Basic (.5 credit) - Using a programming language called QBasic, the student will learn fundamental programming functions before progressing to a more advanced programming language in the future. Flowcharts, algebraic skills, and analogical processes will be used to create structured programs. This course teaches students to program and learn a programming language. Simple statements (e.g. PRINT, INPUT, LET, IF, THEN, ELSE, COLOR, and END) will enable students to create programs and perform calculations, interact with the user, and make decisions. Prerequisites: Algebra I; Advanced computer skills; Geometry is strongly recommended

AP Computer Science A (1 credit) - An introductory computer course which involves developing the skills needed to write programs or parts of programs that correctly solve specific problems. Also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and (when appropriate) reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and classes is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. An understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course. Prerequisites: Algebra I & II

Web Design I (Multimedia Design) (1 credit) - Enables the student to become a Web Design Intern for a virtual company called Education Designs. The student will use the same computer each day and will have access to storage space on that computer. The student will learn Internet basics, HTML, and the file structure of a well-organized Web site. Visually interesting Web pages will be developed using clear text, complimentary colors, visual assets, and appealing designs. The student will learn how to navigate the Internet to build a Web site with useful and well-researched information. The Web pages developed can be used as information sources for other Internet users. Prerequisites: Computer Applications and/or Keyboarding

Web Design II (Info Tech Pilot) (1 credit) - Takes the student through the entire Web site construction process from planning, through creating the structure, to adding the final graphics to enhance the completed design. The student will use the same computer each day and will have access to storage space on that computer. The student will learn how to create a storyboard or blueprint for a Web site; learn about Web site navigation, style sheets, graphic creation, digital image optimization, security, and server hosting; and learn how to work in teams, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. Prerequisites: Computer Applications and/or Keyboarding,, Web Design I

Workforce Essentials (1 credit) - Provides students with higher-level academic and occupational skills that are transferable across jobs and occupational areas. Emphasis is placed on career development and employment.

Forestry (1 credit) - Designed to enable students to become knowledgeable of forestry and wood technology. Emphasis is placed on dendrology, tree measurement, mapping, silviculture, and forest products.

ACT Prep (.5 credit) - Reviews core content material for the four subject tests and prepares students for successfully completing the writing component of the ACT. Students also enhance testing skills through a series of strategy lectures, practice tests, and quizzes.

AP Music Theory (1 credit) - College level Music Theory; explores elements of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony, and analysis; includes weekly ear training as students learn the aspects of form and function. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of music theory, notation, rhythm, scales, key signatures and chords

 

ACCESS Web-Based Courses -  Art Education

AP Art History (1 credit) - Will provide students with an understanding and knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts. Students will examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. Students are encouraged to take the AP Art History Exam in order to earn college credit. AP Art History does not satisfy the one-half credit art requirement for graduation. Prerequisite: History, Literature or Art

Arts Survey (.5 credit) - Introduces students to the four arts disciplines-dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. Arts Survey satisfies the one-half credit art requirement for graduation.

Art Appreciation (.5 credit) - Art history; aesthetics; criticism; analysis; interpretation. Art Appreciation does not satisfy the one-half art credit requirement for graduation.